Attention

X

You are now leaving AMAZE.org.
Content beyond this site might not be
appropriate for young adolescents.

Continue to external site

Attention

X

The following video was not produced by AMAZE.

Play Video
Conversations to Have with an Adult: Puberty, Emotions and more!
Conversations to Have with an Adult: Puberty, Emotions and more!
Add video to playlist Create Playlist
  • AMAZE takes the awkward out of sex ed. Real info in fun, animated videos that give you all the answers you actually want to know about sex, your body and relationships. Find out more at amaze.org Remove
  • Big Test 3 – 42 vids!!! Remove
  • super awesome test Add
  • notha test Add
  • DOWNLOAD_TEST-01 Add
  • Offline Big Test – 36 vids Add
  • Offline 3 Add
  • Offline2 Add
  • third test Add
  • second test list Add
  • Josh Hits Add
  • Puberty Add
  • Test Add
  • Grab-N-Go Add
  • Offline 5 – 21 Vids Add
  • 9 vid test Add
  • Testing missing field…3 vids Add
  • Test List Add
  • download test Add
  • Offline Add
  • test playlist Add
  • Tester Ok! Add
  • edit list test 1 Add
  • new feature jan 2018 Add
  • AMAZE PLAYLIST long playlist title here Add
  • AMAZE PLAYLIST Add
  • Ben Eppard’s Playlist Add
  • Possible Video Supplements Add
  • Il primo uomo sulla luna Add
  • November 22 MDE Pre-Skills Add
  • Human Growth Add
  • puberty Add
  • Health Class Add
  • Sociologia Add
  • introduction Add
  • Jasa Jasa Add
  • My first playlist… Add
  • 8th Relationships Add
  • 6th Puberty Add
  • 7th Relationships Add
  • U Add
  • Reproductive Health Add
  • Feelings Add
  • Effective Listening Add
  • Maybe Add
  • Friends Add
  • Communicating Add
  • 1 Add
  • 1 Add
  • Reproduction Add
  • Young Lady Add
  • Brianna videos Add
  • For Kyran Add
  • ASHA 2017 Add
  • Child Development Class Add
  • Number 1 Add
  • My body Add
  • Dee’s AMAZE List Add
  • Videos I like Add
  • 10/17 Add
  • Just ME! Add
  • My body Add
  • Menstruation Add
  • I need these Add
  • playlist Add
  • Sex Add
  • Girls Changing Bodies Add
  • Your Changing Body Add
  • rotem Add
  • 123 Add
  • 123 Add
  • Red colombia compite Add
  • test Add
  • 6th Grade Add
  • 5th Grade Add
  • 8th Grade Add
  • Preston’s Playlist Add
  • Parker’s Playlist Add
  • Multiple Intelligences Add
  • Puberty 7th and 8th grade videos Add
  • 7th and 8th SAFETY Videos Add
  • 7 & 8 HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS playlist Add
  • Videos To Watch Add
  • I ❤️ BNP Add
  • Duplessey Walker Add
  • Relationships Add
  • Puberty Add
  • HUMANISMO Add
  • Carson Add
  • health Add
  • Consent Add
  • Internet Safety Add
  • MOMENTOS DE VERDAD Add
  • MOMENTOS DE VERDAD Add
  • Katelyn Add
  • ASHA Conference Add
  • Gwen Add
  • Leeya Add
  • metal Add
  • dress Add
Conversations to Have with an Adult: Puberty, Emotions and more!

Youth

Sometimes it can be awkward to ask a parent or trusted adult questions about puberty and sex. As uncomfortable as it may feel, remember that they were once your age and went through the same things you are going through. A parent or adult you trust can provide the support you deserve as you go through puberty. That’s why it is important for you to have at least one adult you trust and can talk with.

Choose someone you think is a good listener and won’t be judgmental. Choose someone who will help you figure out what to do in a tough spot or help you process your feelings and thoughts. Look for someone you admire—someone you think you might like to grow up to be like one day. Ask yourself, Do I respect this person? Do I trust them? Will they take me seriously? Will they respect me and not judge me? Trusted adults can be your parents, grandparents, other relatives, caregivers, teachers or coaches. Even your friends’ parents can provide advice, answer difficult questions, share their values and/or faith traditions and help you as you grow into an adult. Regardless of who a trusted adult is to you, what matters is that this person provide the support you need and deserve.

FAQs

I am so embarrassed to talk with my parents about this stuff. What can I do?

It is totally normal to feel embarrassed to talk about these topics with your parents, especially if your family has never talked about puberty and growing up. However, it is important to remember that adults were your age at one point in their lives, and they have a lot of experience with these topics. You may be surprised how open and willing they are to talk.

If you still don’t feel like you can talk to a parent, you can identify another adult that you trust to have these conversations with. This might be another relative, a teacher, a coach, a guidance counselor or even a friend’s parent.

My mom wants to talk about this stuff with me all the time, and I am just so embarrassed. What can I do?

It is totally normal to feel embarrassed to talk about these topics with your parents. Most likely, your mom just wants to show you that she supports you and that you can talk to her if you have questions. If you feel like she is being too pushy or overbearing, just let her know that you aren’t ready to talk about these topics right now, but if and when you are ready, you understand that she is there for you.

Parents

Adolescence can be an exciting and challenging time when both young people’s bodies and minds are going through lots of changes. Having at least one trusted adult they can talk to about sensitive topics, such as puberty, their feelings and growing up, really helps. Trusted adults can be parents, grandparents, other relatives, caregivers, teachers or coaches. Even a young person’s friends’ parents can provide advice, answer difficult questions, share their values and/or faith traditions. Regardless of who a trusted adult is, what matters is that this person provide the support a young person needs and deserves. This is especially true for young people facing additional physical, emotional or social challenges.

Young people can feel awkward and nervous about talking with adults, especially if they know adults are going to judge or lecture them. While an adult may want to do all of the talking and tell a young person how to feel and what to think, this is a sure way to have a young person withdraw. An adult who listens to what young people have to say and respects their experiences and perspectives will earn their trust. If a young person does not feel judged, that young person is more likely to be honest with an adult and seek out help if they get into trouble, feel uncomfortable at a party or need help handling a tough situation.

Effective communication is the foundation of healthy relationships, and this is true for relationships between young people and their parents, caregivers or other trusted adults. As a parent or trusted adult, you can help your child or another young person practice good communication skills by demonstrating healthy communication skills in your conversations with them and being a supportive listener when a young person needs help.

The easiest way to start conversations about communication is to talk about it as it comes up in everyday life, like while watching a show or movie together.

Here are some ways to start these conversations:

 

 

Educators default

Adolescence can be an exciting and challenging time when both young people’s bodies and minds are going through lots of changes. Having at least one trusted adult they can talk to about sensitive topics, such as puberty, their feelings and growing up, really helps. Trusted adults can be parents, grandparents, other relatives, caregivers, teachers or coaches. Even a young person’s friends’ parents can provide advice, answer difficult questions, share their values and/or faith traditions. Regardless of who a trusted adult is, what matters is that this person provide the support a young person needs and deserves. This is especially true for young people facing additional physical, emotional or social challenges.

Young people can feel awkward and nervous about talking with adults, especially if they know adults are going to judge or lecture them. While an adult may want to do all of the talking and tell a young person how to feel and what to think, this is a sure way to have a young person withdraw. An adult who listens to what young people have to say and respects their experiences and perspectives will earn their trust. If a young person does not feel judged, that young person is more likely to be honest with an adult and seek out help if they get into trouble, feel uncomfortable at a party or need help thinking through how to handle a tough situation.