Attention

X

You are now leaving AMAZE.org.
Content beyond this site might not be
appropriate for young adolescents.

Continue to external site

Attention

X

The following video was not produced by AMAZE.

Play Video
So, You Think You're Pregnant
So, You Think You're Pregnant
Add video to playlist Create Playlist
  • AMAZE takes the awkward out of sex ed. Real info in fun, animated videos that give you all the answers you actually want to know about sex, your body and relationships. Find out more at amaze.org Remove
  • Big Test 3 – 42 vids!!! Remove
  • super awesome test Remove
  • notha test Add
  • DOWNLOAD_TEST-01 Add
  • Offline Big Test – 36 vids Remove
  • Offline 3 Add
  • Offline2 Add
  • third test Add
  • second test list Add
  • Josh Hits Add
  • Puberty Add
  • Test Add
  • Grab-N-Go Add
  • Offline 5 – 21 Vids Add
  • 9 vid test Add
  • Testing missing field…3 vids Add
  • Test List Add
  • download test Add
  • Offline Add
  • test playlist Add
  • Tester Ok! Add
  • edit list test 1 Add
  • new feature jan 2018 Add
  • AMAZE PLAYLIST long playlist title here Add
  • AMAZE PLAYLIST Add
  • Ben Eppard’s Playlist Add
  • Possible Video Supplements Add
  • Il primo uomo sulla luna Add
  • November 22 MDE Pre-Skills Add
  • Human Growth Add
  • puberty Add
  • Health Class Add
  • Sociologia Add
  • introduction Add
  • Jasa Jasa Add
  • My first playlist… Add
  • 8th Relationships Add
  • 6th Puberty Add
  • 7th Relationships Add
  • U Add
  • Reproductive Health Add
  • Feelings Add
  • Effective Listening Add
  • Maybe Add
  • Friends Add
  • Communicating Add
  • 1 Add
  • 1 Add
  • Reproduction Add
  • Young Lady Add
  • Brianna videos Add
  • For Kyran Add
  • ASHA 2017 Add
  • Child Development Class Add
  • Number 1 Add
  • My body Add
  • Dee’s AMAZE List Add
  • Videos I like Add
  • 10/17 Add
  • Just ME! Add
  • My body Add
  • Menstruation Add
  • I need these Add
  • playlist Add
  • Sex Add
  • Girls Changing Bodies Add
  • Your Changing Body Add
  • rotem Add
  • 123 Add
  • 123 Add
  • Red colombia compite Add
  • test Add
  • 6th Grade Add
  • 5th Grade Add
  • 8th Grade Add
  • Preston’s Playlist Add
  • Parker’s Playlist Add
  • Multiple Intelligences Add
  • Puberty 7th and 8th grade videos Add
  • 7th and 8th SAFETY Videos Add
  • 7 & 8 HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS playlist Add
  • Videos To Watch Add
  • I ❤️ BNP Add
  • Duplessey Walker Add
  • Relationships Add
  • Puberty Add
  • HUMANISMO Add
  • Carson Add
  • health Add
  • Consent Add
  • Internet Safety Add
  • MOMENTOS DE VERDAD Add
  • MOMENTOS DE VERDAD Add
  • Katelyn Add
  • ASHA Conference Add
  • Gwen Add
  • Leeya Add
  • metal Add
  • dress Add
So, You Think You're Pregnant

Youth

 

As people grow up, they may decide to have sex with a partner who cares for and respects them. If a couple has penile-vaginal sex and did not use birth control or the method of birth control failed, pregnancy could occur. Abstinence, or choosing to not have or delay having sex, is the most effective form of birth control. If people choose to have sex, using birth control and condoms every time they have sex is the best way to prevent an unplanned pregnancy and reduce the risk of STDs, including HIV.

 

If a person believes they may be pregnant, they can go to a family planning clinic to get help. It is important to make sure the clinic has actual nurses and doctors working there because some places that offer free pregnancy testing do not provide accurate information.

 

If a pregnant person is a minor, which in most states means they are under 18 years old, it is important for them to talk with a trusted adult, such as a parent, caregiver or counselor. A trusted adult can provide support in taking a pregnancy test and/or getting tested for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). It is also important to tell a trusted adult if a person was forced or pressured to have sex. Forcing or pressuring someone to have sex is sexual assault. Sexual assault is never okay, and it is never the victim’s fault. If the pregnant person is a minor and had sex with someone who is 18 years old or older, this is considered sexual assault in many states, so it is important to talk with a trusted adult. No matter what the circumstances are, if a young person is dealing with a possible pregnancy, it is important to immediately get help from a trusted adult.

FAQs

Can someone my age really get pregnant or get someone pregnant?

There are a lot of myths out there about if, how and when someone can get pregnant. The truth is that once you start to go through puberty, it’s possible to get pregnant or get someone pregnant. That’s why it’s so important to know how pregnancy happens and how to prevent it if you or your partner are not ready.

Where can I get the emergency contraceptive pill? Do I need my parents’ or caretakers’ permission?

The emergency contraceptive pill—Plan B or Next Choice—is available over the counter at any pharmacy or drugstore for purchase by anyone regardless of their age or gender. It is also available at many family planning clinics and health departments as well.

 

The emergency contraceptive pill—Ella—can be prescribed by a health care provider and picked up at a pharmacy.

 

In the majority of states, young people under 18 do not need parental consent to seek reproductive health care services, like getting a prescription for birth control. However, we recommend talking with a parent or trusted adult about this topic. They can often provide support and answer some basic questions for you.

 

Where can I get birth control or condoms? Do I need my parents’ or caretakers’ permission?

Condoms are available at most pharmacies and big box stores for a fee. You can usually get free or low-cost condoms when you visit a family planning clinic, like Planned Parenthood.

 

Most forms of birth control require a prescription from a health care provider. Visiting a local family planning clinic or your current health care provider to talk about your options is the best place to start.

 

In the majority of states, young people under 18 do not need parental consent to see reproductive health care services, like getting a prescription for birth control. However, we recommend talking with a parent or trusted adult about this topic. They can often provide you support and answer some basic questions for you.

Parents

As young people mature, they may begin to engage in sexual behaviors with another person. But before this happens, it is important that they understand that sex can be a good physical and emotional experience when both people are ready, consent to have sex and establish how they will reduce their risk of contracting a sexually transmitted disease (STD) and/or prevent an unplanned pregnancy. Young people should have accurate information about various forms of birth control, including abstinence—the most effective form of birth control.

 

In spite of the best-laid plans and having all of the information they need, there are times when a young person may engage in unprotected sex. It is important that young people know what to do in these instances. You can provide them with information about ways to reduce the chance of unplanned pregnancy or STD transmission after unprotected sex, including emergency contraception (EC) and post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). Here is some important information about pregnancy and STD testing as well as EC and PEP that can be shared with young people:

 

EC—also called the morning-after pill—is a pill that can be bought in a drugstore or pharmacy or picked up from a family planning clinic, like Planned Parenthood. EC can help prevent pregnancy when taken up to five days after unprotected sex or birth control failure. (EC only prevents pregnancy; it does not end or harm a pregnancy that has already started.) The sooner it’s taken, the better it works to prevent pregnancy. Another option is that a health care provider can insert an intrauterine device (IUD) into the uterus of the person at risk for pregnancy after unprotected sex to help prevent an unplanned pregnancy. Neither EC or an IUD prevents STDs, but they can greatly reduce the chance of a pregnancy starting if used soon after unprotected sex.

 

Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is medication that can be started within three days (72 hours) after unprotected sex, including sexual assault to reduce the risk of HIV infection. PEP is available from a health care provider, like a doctor, a family planning clinic such as Planned Parenthood or from the emergency room of a hospital.

 

Another important thing to cover are pregnancy tests. Pregnancy tests can be done at home or in a clinic. Home tests are available in grocery stores, drugstores and local family planning clinics. Some tests are so sensitive that they can be used six days before a missed period. To take a pregnancy test correctly, make sure to read and follow the directions that come inside the package. Most simply require that the person urinates on the stick.

 

Young people also need to know what to do after they get the result of the test. If the test is positive, encourage them to talk with their partner and a trusted adult as there are some big decisions to make. If the pregnancy test is negative, encourage them to talk with their partner about ways to avoid getting into this situation again and discuss whether they are ready for sex and if so, commit to practicing safer sex.

 

Finally, young people need to know how and where they can access STD testing and treatment. STD testing and treatment is offered by most family physicians, at family planning clinics and community health centers. STD testing often involves either a urine test, a simple blood test or a mouth swab. Young people should also understand that most STDs can be treated with medicines provided by a doctor, but there are some STDs that cannot be cured, such as HIV. Regardless of whether an STD can be cured, there are treatments to help people manage those STDs.

 

Providing young people with education about this topic will prepare them to act if they happen to engage in unprotected sex. It also may lead them to seek advice and support from a trusted adult if they ever find themselves in this situation.

 

CONVERSATION STARTERS

 

Parents or guardians can start talking with their children about practicing safer sex and what to do if they have unprotected sex before their children become sexually active. When parents and guardians talk with their children about these topics, children learn that they can come to their parents if and when they have questions. Some people fear that talking with young people about sex will encourage them to have sex. Research has shown that providing information to young people about abstinence and birth control does not increase the likelihood of their having sex or reduce the age at which they begin having sex.

 

As parents and caregivers we want our kids to be safe if and when they decide to engage in sexual behaviors. This means using protection—like condoms and other forms of birth control—and having open and honest conversations with their partners before they decide to engage in sexual behaviors. When parents initiate conversations about these topics and show that they are open and supportive, this sets the stage for children to come to their parents and caregivers with questions or if they need advice.

 

Below are some ways to start these conversations:

 

Bring up the topic while watching a TV show

 

If you’re watching a show where a couple is engaging in sexual behaviors and there is no mention of safer sex, you can talk to your child about it. You could ask, “Do we know if these characters had a conversation about safer sex before they engaged in these behaviors?”

 

Bring up pregnancy when it comes up in a show

 

If you’re watching a show where a couple is pregnant, you can talk to your child about this. You could ask, “Do you think those two characters are ready to have a baby?” You could also ask, “How do you think they could have prevented the pregnancy?”

 

Walk up the aisle where condoms or emergency contraception are

 

If you are at a store or pharmacy, walk past the condom section or emergency contraception. This is an opportunity to talk to your child about these items. You can ask them if they know what they are used for and what they help prevent.

Educators default

On average, young people in the U.S. have first sexual intercourse at about age 17. Well before young people engage in sexual behaviors, they should understand that sex can be a good physical and emotional experience when both partners consent, respect each other boundaries and communicate about preventing an unplanned pregnancy and reducing their risk of contracting an STD. Young people should have accurate information about various forms of birth control, including abstinence—the most effective form of birth control.

 

In spite of the best-laid plans and having all of the information they need, there are times when a young person may engage in unprotected sex. It is important that young people know what to do in these instances. Young people should be educated about ways to reduce the chance of unplanned pregnancy or STD transmission after unprotected sex, including emergency contraception (EC) and post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). Here is some important information about pregnancy and STD testing as well as EC and PEP that young people should be educated about:

 

EC—also called the morning-after pill—is a pill that can be bought in a drugstore or pharmacy or picked up from a family planning clinic, like Planned Parenthood. EC can help prevent pregnancy when taken up to five days after unprotected sex or birth control failure. (EC only prevents pregnancy; it does not end or harm a pregnancy that has already started.) The sooner it’s taken, the better it works to prevent pregnancy. Another option is that a health care provider can insert an intrauterine device (IUD) into the uterus of the person at risk for pregnancy after unprotected sex to help prevent an unplanned pregnancy. Neither EC or an IUD prevents STDs, but they can greatly reduce the chance of a pregnancy starting if used soon after unprotected sex.

 

Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is medication that can be started within three days (72 hours) after unprotected sex, including sexual assault to reduce the risk of HIV infection. PEP is available from a health care provider, like a doctor, a family planning clinic such as Planned Parenthood or from the emergency room of a hospital.

 

Another important thing to cover are pregnancy tests. Pregnancy tests can be done at home or in a clinic. Home tests are available in grocery stores, drugstores and local family planning clinics. Some tests are so sensitive that they can be used six days before a missed period. To take a pregnancy test correctly, make sure to read and follow the directions that come inside the package. Most simply require that the person urinates on the stick.

 

Yong people also need to know what to do after they get the result of the test. If the test is positive, encourage them to talk with their partner and a trusted adult as there are some big decisions to make. If the pregnancy test is negative, encourage them to talk with their partner about ways to avoid getting into this situation again and discuss whether they are ready for sex and if so, commit to practicing safer sex.

 

Finally, young people need to know how and where they can access STD testing and treatment. STD testing and treatment is offered by most family physicians, at family planning clinics and community health centers. STD testing often involves either a urine test, a simple blood test or a mouth swab. Young people should also understand that most STDs can be treated with medicines provided by a doctor, but there are some STDs that cannot be cured, such as HIV. Regardless of whether an STD can be cured, there are treatments to help people manage those STDs.

 

Providing young people with education about this topic will prepare them to act if they happen to engage in unprotected sex. It also may lead them to seek advice and support from a trusted adult if they ever find themselves in this situation.

 

Discussion Questions

After watching the video with your class, process it using the following discussion questions:
  • What are some possible outcomes of unprotected sex mentioned in the video?
  • What are some reasons that someone might engage in unprotected sex?
  • Can you name some of the things someone can do after engaging in unprotected sex to reduce their risk of pregnancy or STDs?
  • Why do you think it is important to learn about this topic?
  • How can having this information be beneficial for someone who has engaged in unprotected sex?